According to the NAACP, one in six black men had been incarcerated as of 2001.  If the current trend continues, one in three black males born today can expect to spend time in prison during his lifetime.  Together African Americans and Hispanics make up 58% of all prisoners in 2008, even though the two groups together comprise only one quarter of the US population.  Five times as many Whites are using drugs as compared to African Americans, yet African Americans are sent to prison for drug offenses at 10 times the rate of Whites.  And then there are the examples of highly publicized cases involving African American males - Central Park 5, Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown and the  Ferguson, MO unrest, just to name a few.  So what is going on with the justice system in America?  Why are many in the African American community asking, "Is it justice...or just us?".  On the next Another View, powerful conversation about justice in America with legal scholars Amos N. Jones, Assistant Professor of Law at the Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law, Campbell University; Dr. Eric Claville, Assistant Dean, School of Liberal Arts and Assistant Professor/Pre-Law Advisor for the Department of Political Science and History, Hampton University; and John Pierre, Vice Chancellor and Professor of Law, Southern University Law Center.  Join us for this critical discussion on the next Another View, Friday, September 19 at noon on 89.5 WHRV-FM or stream us on this blog!

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According to the NAACP, one in six black men had been incarcerated as of 2001.  If the current trend continues, one in three black males born today can expect to spend time in prison during his lifetime.  Together African Americans and Hispanics make up 58% of all prisoners in 2008, even though the two groups together comprise only one quarter of the US population.  Five times as many Whites are using drugs as compared to African Americans, yet African Americans are sent to prison for drug offenses at 10 times the rate of Whites.  And then there are the examples of highly publicized cases involving African American males - Central Park 5, Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown and the  Ferguson, MO unrest, just to name a few.  So what is going on with the justice system in America?  Why are many in the African American community asking, "Is it justice...or just us?".  On the next Another View, powerful conversation about justice in America with legal scholars Amos N. Jones, Assistant Professor of Law at the Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law, Campbell University; Dr. Eric Claville, Assistant Dean, School of Liberal Arts and Assistant Professor/Pre-Law Advisor for the Department of Political Science and History, Hampton University; and John Pierre, Vice Chancellor and Professor of Law, Southern University Law Center.  Join us for this critical discussion on the next Another View, Friday, September 19 at noon on 89.5 WHRV-FM or stream us on this blog!

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On the next Another View Round Table we continue our discussions on race relations in light of events in Ferguson, MO and other US communities.  We'll explore ways that African Americans can reach out to disenfranchised community members to dissipate the anger and begin the healing.  Join Virginian-Pilot columnist Roger Chesley, NSU political science professor Carol Pretlow; community activist Bill Thomas, and journalist, author and talk show host Wil LaVeist for insightful conversation on the next Another View, Friday, September 12 at noon on 89.5 WHRV-FM or stream us on this blog! 

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African American hair is naturally curly, kinky, coiled, wavy - and for decades Black women have used products to chemically alter their natural hair state and make it straight.  But now there is a new movement among Black women to embrace their natural hair and celebrate its unique texture.  So why is this such a challenge for many African American women who for years have been told that beauty equals long, straight, flowing hair?  How did the wearing of natural hair become a political issue African American women? And what about African American men who are not on board with natural hair?  On the next Another View we'll examine the natural hair movement from a female and male perspective.  Our guests include Rosalynne Whitaker-Heck, co-owner of HECK Productions and founder of MANE Event - my authentically natural evolution; Jennifer Heck-Cole, who shares her "going natural" story; NSU political science professor Carol Pretlow; author, journalist and talk show host Wil LaVeist; and award-winning photographer Jason Johnson, creator of the natural hair photography exhibition, "Yours Naturally:  Beauty That Grows on You".  Join us for insightful conversation about the political, social, emotional and physical issues surrounding Black women and their hair on the next Another View, Friday, September 6 at noon on 89.5 WHRV-FM or stream us live on this blog!

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On the next Another View we'll talk with Harvey Smith, Jr., author of "The Second American Revolution:  Closing the Four Basic Gaps of African Americans".  Smith shares the evolution of the African American church and the role it plays in what he calls the "BINE" gap - Business, Income, Net Worth and Education.  The second half of the broadcast is all about music in the African American church with gospel great Karen Clark Sheard, who talks about the gospel music business, and also her efforts to empower women.  It's all on Another View, Friday, August 29 at noon on 89.5 WHRV-FM or stream us live on this blog!

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