April is "Minority Health Month" - and also the commemoration of the 30th anniversary of "The Report of the Secretary's Task Force on Black and Minority Health", also known as the "Heckler Report".  This groundbreaking report was the first time the US government convened a group of health experts to conduct a comprehensive study of the health status of minorities in this country. As a result of this report, additional studies were done, such as the Jackson Heart Study that explored disparties in cardiovascular health and the Healthy Start program that brought infant mortality prevention to underserved communities. In addition,  national standards were set to give guidance to health care workers on how to provide respectful and responsive services to minority patients.  On the next Another View we'll examine the health issues that still plague African Americans, including obesity which is the driving force behind almost all diseases prevalent in the Black community.  Join us for the next Another View, featuring co-host, cardiologist Dr. Keith Newby, Friday, April 24 at NOON on 89.5 WHRV-FM, or stream us live on this blog!

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Like many other illnesses and aliments, studies show that African Americans are more susceptible to heart disease than any other race.  In fact, according to the American Heart and American Stroke Associations, about 45% of black men and 49% of black women have (CVD) cardiovascular disease. This resulted in more than 94,000 deaths in 2009.  But why are the numbers so high among African Americans?  Join Another View Producer, Lisa Godley and Another View on Health Co-Host, Dr. Keith Newby as they explore the causes and cures surrounding African Americans and Cardiovasular Diseases, particularly when it's induced by stress.  Also joining the discussion is Jonathan Smith, PhD and CEO of the Wellness Collaborative and Ulysses Robinson, a heart patient will be on hand to share his experience.  Join us for the next Another View on Health this Friday, March 27th  at noon on 89.5 WHRV-FM or stream us live on this blog!

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"I am so stressed out!"...how many times have you made that statement?  Usually we can calm ourselves down, but the fact is too much stress can cause heart disease!  If you are over stressed and do not manage it, you are more likely to develop heart disease, high blood pressure, chest pain or irregular heartbeats.  On the next Another View on Health, we'll talk about stress induced heart disease with our co-host, Cardiologist Dr. Keith Newby, along with Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Johathan E. Smith, PhD.  Dr. Newby and Dr. Smith will share specific tips on how to relieve stress as well as take care of your heart.  Plus, Lisa Godley takes us back in history to the role Norfolk State University and local churches played in the Civil Rights Movement.  It's all on Another View, Friday, February 27 at noon on 89.5 WHRV-FM, or stream us live on this blog!

 

 

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It's the third leading cause of death in the African American community and Blacks are 50% more likely to experience it than Caucasians.  It's called stroke and African American survivors are more likely to come out of a stroke disabled and unable to participate in everyday activities like walking, lifting, grasping items or socializing with others.  On the next Another View on Health, co-host Dr. Keith Newby and Physiatrist Dr. Beverly Roberts-Atwater talk about stroke - what causes it, how to prevent it, and proper treatment.  Join us for the next Another View on Health, Friday, January 23 at Noon on 89.5 WHRV-FM, or stream us live on this blog!

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The perception is that college binge drinking is a "white college issue" and not really of concern at historically black colleges and universities (HBCU)...but the truth is binge drinking is problematic no matter the racial makeup of the student population.  According to a study of student behavior by the Century Council, 54% of full-time HBCU students who drink engage in binge drinking, compared to 64% of students at predominately white schools.  The difference is in the way the binge drinking occurs.  On the next Another View on Health, we'll explore the dangers of binge drinking with guest host, cardiologist Dr. Keith Newby, and emergency room physician Dr. Clarence Clarke Join us for the next Another View on Health, Friday, November 21 at noon on 89.5 WHRV-FM, or stream us live on this blog!

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